Hallway Kids

Grades 6 - 8 Behavior

Glossary of Terms

Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) - Behavior intervention plans may involve a single intervention or change to a student’s program in response to a functional behavioral analysis. For example, if the functional behavioral analysis found a very specific trigger to a student’s problem behavior, then the intervention may simply change that situation. This could involve giving the student more assistance with certain tasks, breaking tasks or assignments down into more manageable chunks, increasing the frequency of breaks or rewards, providing increased supervision in a specific setting, pairing the student with a buddy, allowing more time to complete certain activities, or providing a more immediate consequence for a problem behavior. The contents of a behavior intervention plan are determined by the findings of a functional behavioral analysis. Behavior intervention plans are designed to reduce prevent problem behaviors from happening while teaching the child another appropriate behavior to replace the problematic behavior.

Bullying -

Classroom Behavioral Expectations – A set of three to five behavioral expectations that are positively stated and easy to remember. Students are taught these expectations using specific examples of what the behavior looks like and examples of what the behavior does not look like. Classroom behavioral expectations are often the same as the building’s school-wide behavioral expectations, but they are not always the same. Some possible examples include:

  • Respect Yourself, Respect Others, and Respect Property
  • Be Safe, Be Responsible, Be Respectful
  • Respect Relationships and Respect Responsibilities

Consequence – The outcome of something that occurred earlier. Consequence within the context of behavioral analysis refers to what the child receives as a result of his or her behavior. For example, consequence of the behavior of hitting your sister may be that the child is not allowed to watch television for a certain amount of time. A natural consequence refers to the outcome that occurs as a direct result of the behavior rather than through adult action. For example, a natural consequence of eating ice cream for dinner is that you will later have a stomach ache. A consequence could a good or bad thing depending on the behavior. A consequence of yelling while in a quiet classroom is that you will get the teacher’s attention. That attention may be a good or bad result depending on the reason for your yell.

Defiant – Bold opposition . A marked resistance to authority.

Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) - A method for finding out what is triggering problem behavior, and what the student is getting out of the behavior that makes him/her want to keep doing the behavior. An FBA involves an examination of how the child interacts with the environment, and attempts to determine where, when, and why problems arise. A functional behavioral analysis is done within a team process that usually involves an expert in behavior (social worker, school psychologist, etc.) and people who best know the student (parents, teachers, principals, etc.). A functional behavioral analysis will also focus on determining what behaviors the child should be taught to replace the problematic behavior.

Grade Level Content Expectations – A set of expectations published by the Michigan Department of Education that provides vision for a relevant health education curriculum that addresses critical health knowledge and skills for successfully maintaining a healthy lifestyle during a child’s school years and beyond.

School Wide Behavior Expectations - The school focuses on three to five behavioral expectations that are positively stated and easy to remember. In other words, rather than telling students what not to do, the school will focus on the preferred behaviors. Some possible examples include:

  • Respect Yourself, Respect Others, and Respect Property
  • Be Safe, Be Responsible, Be Respectful
  • Respect Relationships and Respect Responsibilities

The school many times will create a matrix of what the behavioral expectations look like, sound like, and feel like in all the non-classroom areas. This matrix will have approximately three positively stated examples for each area.

Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) – A proactive, team-based framework for creating and sustaining safe and effective schools. Emphasis is placed on prevention of problem behavior, development of pro-social skills, and the use of data-based problem solving for addressing existing behavior concerns. School-wide PBIS increases the capacity of schools to educate all students utilizing research-based school-wide, classroom, and individualized interventions. The underlying theme is teaching behavioral expectations in the same manner as any core curriculum subject.

Reinforcing – The act of acknowledgement and/or reward that is given after a desired behavior. Reinforcement after a behavior will increase the probability that the behavior will happen again.